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5 New things in neurology

Recording: the recording will be available after October 24th

Duration: 1 hour

Evaluation: the session evaluation will be available after October 24th

Handouts: handouts will be available after October 24th

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Neuro-rehab

Learning Objectives
By the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Discuss advances in neurohabilitation in terms of motor recovery.
  2. Discuss evidence for guidance of botulinum neurotoxin injections.
  3. Identify other areas of advancement in neurorehabilitation. 

Summary:
Will discuss spinal cord stimulation for motor recovery following spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, biomarkers in mild  TBI, guidance techniques in neurotoxin, and transcranial stimulation for aphasia following stroke.


Dr. Nicholas Ketchum is an Associate Professor and residency program director of the department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, WI. He attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison and earned a BS in Biochemistry and attended medical school at the same institution. He completed residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and afterwards completed his fellowship in spasticity management and. His clinical practice is focused on the rehabilitation of patients with stroke and management of patients with spasticity and dystonia.

neuromuscular

Learning Objectives
By the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Understand recent updates in ALS treatment.
  2. Understand recent updates in Myasthenia treatment.
  3. Understand recent updates in Spinal Muscular Atrophy treatment.

Summary:
Neuromuscular updates in recent treatments for ALS, Myasthenia, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. 


Dr. Daniel Anderson is originally from the Twin Cities, attended undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, medical school at Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed residency and neuromuscular fellowship at the University of Iowa. He has been back in La Crosse at the Mayo Clinic Health System since 2019 after completing fellowship.

Pediatric Neurology

Learning Objectives
By the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Recognize the Neurologic features of Multi system Inflammatory Syndrome in children.
  2. Identify pediatric neurology patients at greatest risk for COVID-19 complications.

Summary:
While COVID-19 infection and complication rates are relatively lower in the pediatric population the virus poses an increased risk to some subsets of pediatric neurology patients.  As we see more cases of MIS-C associated with COVID-19, a pattern of neurologic features is emerging. 


Adam Kney, MD is an assistant professor in the in the department of neurology at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. He is a pediatric neurologist who specializes in epilepsy management. As the director of outreach for his group, he is responsible for establishing and fostering relationships with communities and practitioners outside of the UW Health system.

Movement Disorders

Learning Objectives
By the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Recognize newly approved treatments for Parkinson Disease.
  2. Become familiar with innovations in deep brain stimulation technology for the treatment of Parkinson disease.

Summary:
To briefly review newly approved treatments and innovations in deep brain stimulation technology for the treatment of Parkinson disease.


Dr. Ryan Brennan is from Kalamazoo, MI. He received his bachelors and Doctor of Osteopathic medicine degree from Michigan State University. He completed neurology residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin and movement disorder fellowship at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE. He joined the faculty at MCW in 2017 as an assistance professor. His clinical and academic interests are in Parkinson disease, deep brain stimulation for the treatment of movement disorders and quality improvement.

Sleep Disorders

Learning Objectives
By the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1. Recognize common and atypical clinical presentations of RLS versus PLMD.
  2. Understand augmentation as a common and undesirable morbidity of dopamine agonist therapy for RLS, and discuss strategies for clinical management of augmentation.
  3. Create a clinical decision tree “toolbox” for RLS workup and management.

Summary:
Augmentation (paradoxical worsening) of restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a common and undesirable side effect of dopaminergic therapy in RLS. In 2016, a task force established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) recommended consideration for medications such as α2δ ligands for initial RLS treatment, in an effort to minimize risk of augmentation. We will discuss this and alternative non-dopaminergic strategies for RLS treatment.


Dr. Mihaela H. Bazalakova is a board-certified sleep neurologist, who completed her MD PhD training at Vanderbilt University, Neurology residency at Mass General Brigham, and Sleep fellowship at the BIDMC, Boston. As faculty at the University of Wisconsin Madison, she is dedicated to expanding our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in pregnancy. In addition to her clinical-research interests in OSA in pregnancy, Dr. Bazalakova attends on the non-vascular inpatient neurology teaching services and sees clinic patients with all primary sleep disorders, including sleep disordered breathing, sleep movement disorders, hypersomnia, insomnia, and parasomnias.

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